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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
of this stuff. it's out in the open. it's up on the websites of u.n., european union, the american bar association, the deans of most law schools in american universities, leading american foundations. it's all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government anybody, but world governance, a form of transnational governance. look at four people, quick views, and talbot, the president of the brookings institution, a major think tank in washington. the former secretary of state, and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, they wrote an article in which he welcomed super national political authority. he said, quote, "i'll bet within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete and all states will recognize a single global authority." he concluded saying "the devra davis luges of power upwards of units of administration is basically a positive phenomena." coe, currently, today, the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department, in other words, he advises the president on what the law is, was gave a major speech last week at georgetown law,
's right out in the open. up on the web sites of u.n., european union, the american bar association, the deans of most law schools at american universities, leading american foundations, it's all there on the internet. and people are not talking about world government anymore, they're talking about global gore nance -- governance, this form of transnational governance. so let's look at four people, quick views of theirs, who have given ideas about this. strobe talbot is currently the president of the brookings institution, he's former secretary of state and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, talbot wrote an article in which he welcomed supernational political authority. he said, quote: i'll bet that within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete, and all state will recognize a single global authority. he concluded by saying that this devolution of power upwards toward the supernational and downwards toward autonomous units of administration is basically a positive phenomena. harold coe is currently -- today he's the chief legal adviser of the u.
by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign. >> reporter: after meeting with rice for more than an hour, collins emerged questioning her judgment in giving the public what turned out to be incorrect information in the days after the deadly attack in benghazi. and the main republican was lukewarm about the prospect of rice as secretary of state. if president obama were to nominate susan rice to be the next secretary of state, could you support that nomination? >> i would need to have additional information before i could support her nomination. >> reporter: collins has gone out of her way to support rice in the past. even introducing rice family ties to maine at a confirmation hearing for u.n. ambassador. >> the people of maine are proud of what this remarkable woman has accomplished. >> reporter: whether collins supports rice now for a promotion is crucial because of the raw numbers. rice would likely need 60 votes to overcome a filibuster by these gop senators assuming all 55 sen
important element, the u.n. dimension: respect for the territorial integrity and independence of iraq. so that meant that the action team could not go to nondeclared facilities. only delareed facilities could be -- declared facilities could be inspected. but then the security council formed out that right to, i would say, break the integrity to the -- [inaudible] so they were charged with nondeclared facilities and activities. of course, then it was, obviously, chemical, biological. but the beauty of these wars that it's tough sanctions system was in place. we have to have that also. but immediately when the inspection started, the sanction system was gradually released. so this was a functioning system, good behavior led also to these single sanctions. bad behavior, which happened, of course, quite frequently, some blockages and refusals, was met by some tough language from the security council. not from the israeli government or anyone, it was security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. so, of course, we know that this system works extremely well. it
how the president wants u.n. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. margaret brennan joins us now. good morning. >> good morning to you, norah, and to charlie. quarterback at the u.n. when he nominated her to be the ambassador, he elevated that role to cabinet level, a status that her predecessors did not have. for this next promotion, the president will fight skeptical republicans who question rice's judgment in the days following the benghazi attacks. >> i still don't know how anybody of that capacity could have been on television five days later saying the things that were said. i don't know how that could happen. >> she would have to answer questions about that. there's no doubt about it. >> susan rice hit a nerve during a string of television appearances five days after the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. she did not call it an act of terror. >> we did not have information at present that leads us to conclude that this was premeditated or preplanned. >> that characterization is the biggest obstacle to becoming secretary of state. seni
the ambassador. he wants to push the issue into play at the u.n., he's summoned the arab league. morisi does not he ban to attach himself to hamas let alone to the jihaddist groups, smaller ones that are operating in gaza. he has a loan that they are negotiating, a billion-plus in military assistance from the united states. he's got multiple audiences on this. he's going to appear supportive. the question is can he bring his influence? remember, the muslim brotherhood is in fact the foundation stone from which hamas emerged. he does have influence with hamas. they share a common border. hamas has to give some credibility to what he wants and to what he said. the question is, how much time do we have before this escalates to a ground incursion? jon: the palestinians profess they want their own state. hard to argue that you deserve statehood when you're launching rockets at your neighbor. >> you have three states between the mediterranean and the jordan river. have you a weak and dysfunctional palestinian authority which controls 40% of the west bank. you have a highly centralized hamas which
come back in the next bulletin, we will have more at the palestinian vote at the u.n. in new york. join us for that. >> our correspondent is standing by at the united nations. we will have the very latest. stay with us. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
the diplomacy route, we're also expecting u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon. also the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abb abbas. we do not know if he'll be meeting with any hamas officials. he most certainly is not expected to be making a trip to gaza. another explosion again in the distance. we're hearing sirens from the streets below.happening, we are expecting a trip from the 16 foreign ministers, the members of the arab league as well as the turkish foreign minister. certainly a lot of movement on the diplomatic front, but we're stillen continuing to hear e explosi explosions. >> i'm sure people very accustomed to noises like that. arwa damon, thank you. >>> israeli president shimon peres says he is concerned about stopping the iranians from sending long-range missiles to hamas. peres telling piers morgan he sees two distinct story lines developing in this gaza conflict. one positive, one negative. >> the positive is the constructive wall that the egyptian president is playing right now, and we appreciate very much his efforts. the other is the iranians. they
brennan is in washington. >> reporter: president obama views susan rice as his quarterback at the u.n. when he nominated her to be the ambassador he elevated that role to cabinet level. a status that her predecessors did not have. for this next promotion the president will fight skeptical republicans who question rice's judgment in the days following the benghazi attack. >> i still don't know how anybody of that capacity could have been on television five days later saying the things that were said. i don't know how that can happen. >> she has to answer questions about that. there's no doubt about it. >> reporter: susan rice hit a nerve during a string of television appearances five days after the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. she didn't call it a act of terror. >> we do not have information at present to lead us to conclude it was preplanned. >> reporter: that's leading to her obstacle as becoming secretary of state. john mccain and lindsey graham said they will try to keep her out of office. the white house said she was relying on the cia's best information at the time.
that it's actually a state, and to justify more assistance, i think it will try and use u.n. channels more effectively to get money and may well join other u.n. specialized agencies now that the general assembly said it's the state. ab you know, israel and the state department have tried to play down yesterday's vote, but i'm afraid unlike a lot of u.n. votes which truly are completely meaningless, this one is going to have a real effect. >> ultimately i've got about 20 seconds left. are we going to be looking at billions of american taxpayer dollars going to palestine? >> under the obama administration, i think it's a real risk. i think they've been hostile to israel and this is one more step to make it easier for the obama people to do exactly that. >> okay. and ambassador john boulton, always a pleasure. >> thank you. stuart: coming up new at 10, the journal "science" comes out with a new study on climate change and could give even more ammunition for a global carbon tax. ammunition for new tax, that will be coming up for you at the top of this hour and as we always say, time is money a
. jon: several republican lawmakers are toning down their criticism of u.n. ambassador susan rice and her handling of the deadly attack on the consulate in libya. ambassador rice was under fire for appearances on the television immediately after the attack where she blamed it on the youtube video. many vocal critics, like senator john mccain are turning up the heat on president obama and the state department. >> the problem is the president of the united states in a debate with mitt romney said that he had said it was a terrorist attack. he hadn't. jon: chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington. she has more on all of this. so this shift in focus to the state department, what are we learning about that, catherine? report thank you, jon, and good morning. we may learn early as this week when secretary of state hillary clinton will testify on capitol hill about the warnings and intelligence leading up to the 9/11 attack on the consulate. on sunday talk shows leading republicans pointed to what they believe is the culpability of clinton's state departm
.m. eastern. a number of senators have been meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice in the wake of her comments following the attack on the benghazi consulate. just wrapping up is a brief news conference and statement with senators. here is a look. >> i had a very candid ambassador rice embassador ric and the deputy director of the cia. [inaudible] she said if it was a spontaneous demonstration. it was not. there was telling evidence at that time. >> [inaudible] i am very disappointed in our intelligence community. i think they failed in many ways. i think it would be pretty clear that to explain this episode as related to a video that created a mob that turned into a riot was far-filled. at the end of the day, we are going to get to the bottom of this. we have to have a system that we trust. if you don't know what happened, just say you don't know what happened. you can say "i do not want to give that information." you can say the american people got bad information from president obama in the days after. the question is should they have been given the information at all? if you can d
, it just adds to these continuing layers of a narrative. if we are to expect that the u.n. ambassador, potentially the future secretary of state didn't have access and wasn't involved in discussions five days on from the attacks talking about the scenario of the terrorists the fact that there was no protest she talked about sunday morning show, then we have a serious problem. >> the picture in your head is she is handed a packet of paper. she reads it over, says thank you and goes and delivers it to the media. is that how it works? there is some sort of briefing, it's more than papers there is a discussion about what happened in which someone that is going to be the secretary of state should ask questions. correct? >> right. absolutely much the idea that somehow, you know, she slipped one page briefing memo with some talking points that by the way have been edited constantly apparently since the cia produced the basic intelligence, the raw intelligence from the field talking about what had been happening, it doesn't add up. and nothing happens in washington, you know, in a bubble. it'
their leader and needed help to do it and went to the u.n. to get that help. >> there were large numbers of iraqis that would have liked him overthrown -- >> there's a much more sectarian situation. >> sure it was. >> and libya was not a sectarian situation. so if you had a situation where you had support with the vast majority of the people, and you had u.n. backing so there was no way it could be tarred as a u.s.-alone, imperialistic attack to try to scoop up natural resources for yourself and cause blowback, then, yes -- >> i have seen this movie before, and hearing this talk about, oh, yeah, we're not going to bring in the exiles, and we're going to pick legitimate people in the country, and tom friedman backs it up. please. i saw it the first time. you guys were all in school the first time, but even there you probably got the idea that it didn't work out so hot. let's just let things happen the way they're going to -- let other people worry about their own countries. we have enough problems in this country. >> jim, did you have -- [applause] >> yeah. no, that's fairly similar to my
north korea it strikes me that kim jung un is allowing to some westernized foods and such in. do you foresee anything be an done about the boming and the supposed sunken ship? i don't see any sanctions from the administration on north korea. what specifically president obama dealing with this, i think there are things that should be done. i think he could possibly talk to him and maybe get back to the six party talks. i would like to know your views on that. thank you. guest: i think that's a good point. the new leader in north korea, kim jong un, is in power. but it is a famously closed society. there's certainly a fear of nuclear escalation and there have been shakeups within the north korean military. whether or not that's an internal power struggle, we do not know. one of the top generals was perhaps killed by mortar fire. perhaps that is something that obama will bring to the table on his trip to asia, but i think there is a consistent policy that we want to prevent nuclear escalation in the region and it is true for all sides. japan, south korea, china, and other areas. we just
fearlessly stood up to the drug cartels found murdered. >>> and face-to-face behind closed doors today, u.n. ambassador susan rice takes on one of her sharpest critics, senator john mccain, over her actions after the benghazi attack. good morning and welcome to "early start," i'm deborah feyerick in for john berman. >> really nice to have you. >> i'm so glad to be here. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. it's 5:00 a.m. in the east. first, congress back to work, and back to bickering. in just under 35 days, america hits the fiscal cliff. that triggers severe spending cuts and tax hikes. several top republicans are now defying party politics and signaling a willingness to consider increasing tax revenues to get a budget deal done. but when the lame duck senate got back in session yesterday it sure sounded like the same old broken record. >> the senate has spoken. president obama has spoken. he's promising he will not sign any bill that mortgages our future to pay for handouts to the wealthiest 2% of americans. i only hope house republicans have been listening. >> we've been responsible, even as we've r
at the u.n. and e had this graphic -- he had this graphic illustration of the problem, he was, he created what was a new threshold for them. he called it a red line, but a new threshold. they had -- for the previous, i don't know, 6-12 months the israelis had been focusing on, primarily because of the defense minister, ehud barak, the zone of immunity. and what he meant was iran was going to with the character of its nuclear program, the depth, the breadth, the redundancy, the hardening of the nuclear program was going to reach a point where the israelis would actually lose their military option. and no israeli prime minister is going to accept a situation where they face an existential threat, but they no longer have a military option to deal with it. so ehud barak was trying to identify the point at which the zone of immunity was going to kick in. now, he was saying it was going to be the end of 2012. now, he's changed that and said it's been pushed back 8-12 -- 8-10 months. when the prime minister was in new york he focused not on the zone of immunity, he focused on what's the point in
. when i look at what's going on this area, to u.n. security council is dysfunctional, not working, not capable of coming to a conclusion. the g20 has not fulfilled, at least not according to me, the expectations we had when this larger body was created. in other words, from a european point of view, you need to worry about the fact that europe will have obviously a smaller portion of the cake in the future. germany is going to a 1% of the worlds population. the e.u. altogether 5%, 40 or so. in other words, what probably needs minority protection. we have a ton about that much. that's a specific problem for europeans, not so much for americans. if that is correct analysis, did we need to worry about global governance. we are capable as long as we are in charge and as long as we still represent to some degree the majority and as long as are capable for helping to shape the international system. we are capable of shaping an international system, which will be sustained even when we are only a minority. in other words, we called the shot. can we reform the u.n., the g20 system and oth
diplomats are coming to israel and to 9 region, not just the u.n. secretary-general, but the u.s. secretary of state as you've just said has been dispatched by president obama to meet face-to-face with the principles in this conflict. the prime minister of israel, the president of egypt who is taking the lead in organizing these cease-fire negotiations from the hamas side with israel. soledad? >> christiane, that sounds like the short-term option, right? you sort of try to hold everything down while you negotiate some kind of a short-term peace. what are people saying about the longer-term options here? >> well, you know, there's a lot of devil in the details, as always. you know, each side wants to make sure it's not just a short-term. it's a long-term option. because on the one hand, israel wants a long-term solution to the rockets that are being fired into israel, and into threatening the residents of that area of southern israel close to gaza. on the other hand, the hamas and the palestinians in gaza want a long-term solution to lifting the siege of gaza, and also want a promise, a pled
a letter to barack obama on monday saying the u.n. ambassador susan rice miss led the nation about the attack on the united states consulate in libya. looking at one of last news item from politico, congressman alan west, if republican, has conceded florida's 18th district. this in a statement to politico -- the republican had been challenging the vote counting process and st. lucie county. we were watching to see how that was resolved. allen west conceding that race. thank you for all of your calls. on thursday morning, one of our first segment at 7:45 will be speaking to a professor at the university of maryland. there will give some insight into the current situation in the middle east. that is all for this segment. coming up next, we will look to the effort to rebuild and fix up the damage in the wake of hurricane sandy. the wall street journal's andrew grossman will join us for that. thomas ricks will be here to talk about that. we will be right back. ♪ >> , there are many people who might take issue with a grand setting the union during the civil war. did not lay gannett do
. democrats say this explains why u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice said after the attack that it was a mob protesting and anti-muslim video and not a terror strike but republicans contend the obama administration wanted to downplay terrorism from the start. >> the issue is from what was released from c.i.a. headquarters on friday afternoon in an unclassified memo to the point it was changed to the sunday morning talk shows there is a gap we need to account for and understand why it was changed. >> all the intelligence community have told us that initially they recognize there were terrorists involved but they thought it came from the protests, that it took time to sort that out. >> molly: c.i.a. talking points would have gone through numerous hands, various intelligence agencies, white house, state department, justice department before going out to lawmakers. >> gregg: so nobody is terribly forthcoming about who did it. molly henneberg, thanks very much. >> heather: illegal immigration a hot button issue and today we understand that republican lawmakers are now working on
are only a minority? in other words, when others call the shots. can we reform the u.n., the g20 system, and other international institutions including the world bank, an antiquated voting system, except her in a way that the rising powers, when they asked for a greater share of the cake, they find that acceptable, legitimate, and fair. i think that is a huge task that we should commit ourselves to, but with a sense of confidence. so far i think there is no reason for us to believe that we have run out of steam. >> i feel like them back in the u.s. election with my hedge fund buddies talking about the travails of the 1%. let's broaden the discussion, bring in some of are more diverse voices. anybody want to enter the conversation, just raise your hand. alcoa new. we have people with mike sue want to colony. the state your name and affiliation and ask a question record comment. >> thank you. i would like the fast you the following question. you have mentioned a number of, let's say, tools with such as several weapons, such as drones and special forces. there just tools. to achieve what?
by the populationst un is against us? >> that is the answer i have just given you.r tha the rules of engagement are different but i cannot make specific judgment with your written a vice but it is the sole reason it is a complex tapestry of a number of reasons. >> if i might their recent statistics. and the north atlantic council always takes an interest.on the latest report suggested % of civil 80% of casualties are caused by the insurgents to be at issued did to the outer forces. >> don't misunderstand. my question relates 20,063rd 2007. >> those in civilian casualties there is still blamed for the level oftime violence sometimes precarious. >> as soon as there is any indit indication but local a visit maybebility and casualty. so that maybe the environment attributed. >> with a final remark protecting the civilian population we have that protection that would not be t viable the. >> general, deciding the eules of engagement with the north atlantic council and does direct that the rules of engagd does direct that the rules of engagement and there itti and i possibility of as civilian casualty
's unparalleled success. at the u.n. last year, president obama spoke strongly about this thing that the u.s. quote will support a free and open internet so individuals have the information to make up their own minds. no one has been a more forceful advocate of the economic and social opportunities of the open internet and secretary of state hillary clinton. who delivered a landmark speech on internet freedom in 2010 when she said that one of the fundamental freedoms of the internet age was the freedom to connect. the idea that government should not prevent people from connecting to the internet, to websites, or to each other. now, internet freedom is sometimes cited as an obstacle to addressing the issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft. i disagree with that. i disagree not because i question the importance of issues of the magnitude of the threat. a very serious problem we have to address. but i believe based on my experience that we can address those issues without undermining the core values like internet freedom and privacy. we've put our money where our mouths are at
and a person i am proud to call my friend and more proud to call my u.n. ambassador and would be even more proud to call her my secretary of state. so let us be clear it is unfair and i think unpatriot tick to assume that the chief diplomat would woefully, purposefully mislead the american public. to be come police to us in this tragedy at all is offensive. i think we need to get back to the nation's business and finding the real cull patriots who took the lives of the four americans. we need to leave the full weight of the american government to find those cull patriots and leave ambassador rice alone to do her job. let's get back to the work of the american people. >> as you can see there is a great deal of passion on this issue and to close us out it's going to be a good friend and colleague of ours from california who herself has had years of distinguished leadership in the california assembly as the speaker. mad dam speaker. and really understands leadership abilities and what they are. it's very difficult to recruit qualified women and senator mccain should know that. it is very diff
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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